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Home > Health Conditions > Gout

Gout

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  • High fiber diets may alleviate inflammation caused by gout - Science Daily, 1/4/17 - "diets high in fiber trigger microorganisms in the gut to produce short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), which induce neutrophil apoptosis and the resolution of inflammation. These findings have important implications for the treatment of gout, and possibly for the treatment of arthritis"
  • Quercetin lowers plasma uric acid in pre-hyperuricaemic males: a randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial - Br J Nutr. 2016 Jan 20:1-7 - "The intervention included one tablet containing 500 mg quercetin daily for 4 weeks, compared with placebo, with a 4-week washout period between treatments ... After quercetin treatment, plasma uric acid concentrations were significantly lowered by -26·5 µmol/l (95 % CI, -7·6, -45·5; P=0·008), without affecting fasting glucose, urinary excretion of uric acid or blood pressure" - See quercetin at Amazon.com.
  • Lowering Dietary Glycemic Index Reduces Plasma Uric Acid - Medscape, 1/13/16 - "A low–glycemic index (GI) diet including foods such as legumes, dairy products, and some fruits might help prevent the development of gout or the occurrence of gout flares ... Reducing GI lowered uric acid by 0.24 mg/dL when the percentage of carbohydrates was low and by 0.17 mg/dL when the percentage of carbohydrates was high (both P < .001). Conversely, reducing the percentage of carbohydrates increased uric acid by 0.10 mg/dL when GI was high (P = .05) and had no significant effect when GI was low. The largest effect was seen with reducing the GI while increasing the percentage of carbohydrates, which reduced uric acid by 0.27 mg/dL (P < .001), an effect maintained even after adjustment for changes in kidney function, insulin sensitivity, and products of glycolysis"
  • Eating cherries lowers risk of gout attacks by 35%, study suggests - Science Daily, 9/28/12 - "Our findings indicate that consuming cherries or cherry extract lowers the risk of gout attack ... The gout flare risk continued to decrease with increasing cherry consumption, up to three servings over two days.” The authors found that further cherry intake did not provide any additional benefit" - See cherry extracts at Amazon.com.
  • Foods to Avoid if You Want to Avoid Gout Attacks - WebMD, 5/30/12 - "People who had the highest amounts of compounds called purines in their diets increased their risk of having a gout flare-up by almost five times compared to those eating the least purine-rich foods, a new study shows ... Foods with the highest purine content include liver, organ, and game meats, sardines, mussels, anchovies, herring, and beer ... Foods with moderate levels of purine include red meats, chicken, fish, asparagus, mushrooms, peas, beans, lentils, cauliflower, and spinach"
  • Polyphenols may reduce risk of gout: Study - Nutra USA, 12/13/10 - "Gout is a painful form of arthritis caused by disturbances in uric acid metabolism, when an overload of uric acid leads to the formation of urate crystals in bodily tissues, especially the joints – leading to recurring attacks of joint inflammation ... Hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance can lead to increased uric acid re-absorption in the kidneys, which in turn can lead to a rise in serum uric acid concentration ... these results suggest that Oligonol lowers serum uric acid through inhibition of xanthine oxidase, and may be effective for prevention and treatment of hyperuricemia and/or gout" - See oligonol at Amazon.com.
  • Fructose-rich beverages associated with increased risk of gout in women - Science Daily, 11/10/10 - "Compared with consumption of less than 1 serving per month, women who consumed one serving per day had a 74 percent increased risk of gout; and those with 2 or more servings per day had a 2.4 times higher risk ... Orange juice intake was also associated with risk of gout. Compared with women who consumed less than a glass (6 oz.) of orange juice per month, women who consumed 1 serving per day had a 41 percent higher risk of gout, and there was a 2.4 times higher risk with 2 or more servings per day"
  • Coffee consumption and risk of incident gout in women: the Nurses' Health Study - Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Aug 25 - "There was an inverse association between higher coffee intake and the risk of gout. The multivariate relative risks (RRs) for incident gout according to coffee-consumption categories [ie, 0, 1-237, 238-947, and >/=948 mL coffee/d (237 mL = one 8-ounce cup)] were 1.00, 0.97, 0.78 (95% CI: 0.64, 0.95), and 0.43 (95% CI: 0.30, 0.61; P for trend < 0.0001), respectively. For decaffeinated coffee, the multivariate RRs according to consumption categories (0, 1-237, and >/=237 mL decaffeinated coffee/d) were 1.00, 1.02, and 0.77 (95% CI: 0.63, 0.95; P for trend = 0.02), respectively. There was an inverse association between total caffeine from all sources and the risk of gout; the multivariate RR of the highest quintile compared with the lowest quintile was 0.52 (95% CI: 0.41, 0.68; P for trend <0.0001)"
  • Vitamin C May Help Prevent Gout - WebMD, 3/9/09 - "men who had the highest vitamin C intake from supplements and food were up to 45% less likely to develop the painful condition than those who had the lowest ... the results suggest that taking vitamin C supplements at the levels in the study (less than 2,000 milligrams per day) may be a safe and effective way to prevent gout" - See vitamin C products at Amazon.com.
  • Vitamin C May Prevent Hyperuricemia, Gout - Medscape, 9/26/08 - "Hyperuricemia is considered a precursor of gout, which is the most common inflammatory arthritis in adult men ... An association was observed between greater vitamin C intake and lower prevalence of hyperuricemia defined as > 6 mg/dL. The multivariable odds ratio for hyperuricemia for the highest intake of vitamin C (>1000 mg/d) compared to the lowest (<90 mg/d) was 0.34 ... These findings support a potential role of vitamin C in the prevention of hyperuricemia and gout" - See vitamin C products at Amazon.com.
  • Increased Coffee Consumption May Reduce Risk for Gout in Men - Medscape, 5/25/08 - "During the 12-year study, there were 757 confirmed incident cases of gout. Increasing coffee intake was inversely associated with the risk for gout, with multivariate relative risks (RRs) for incident gout of 1.00, 0.97, 0.92, 0.60 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.41 - 0.87), and 0.41 (95% CI, 0.19 - 0.88) for coffee consumption categories of 0, less than 1, 1 to 3, 4 to 5, and 6 or more cups per day, respectively ... For decaffeinated coffee, the multivariate RRs for 0, less than 1, 1 to 3, and 4 or more cups per day were 1.00, 0.83, 0.67 (95% CI, 0.54 - 0.82), and 0.73 (95% CI, 0.46 - 1.17), respectively"
  • Vitamin C Intake and Serum Uric Acid Concentration in Men - J Rheumatol. 2008 May 1 - "An inverse dose-response association was observed through vitamin C intake of 400-500 mg/day, and then reached a plateau ... Greater vitamin C intake was associated with lower prevalence of hyperuricemia (serum uric acid > 6 mg/dl). Multivariate odds ratios for hyperuricemia across total vitamin C intake categories were 1 (reference), 0.58, 0.57, 0.38, and 0.34 (95% CI 0.20-0.58; P for trend < 0.001). When we used dietary data, which were assessed 4-8 years before blood collection, as predictors, we observed similar inverse associations between vitamin C intake and uric acid ... These population-based data indicate that vitamin C intake in men is inversely associated with serum uric acid concentrations. These findings support a potential role of vitamin C in the prevention of hyperuricemia and gout" - See vitamin C products at Amazon.com.
  • Drinking 4 or More Cups of Coffee a Day May Help Prevent Gout - Medscape, 8/23/07 - "the risk for developing gout decreased with increasing coffee consumption. The risk of gout was 40 percent lower for men who drank 4 to 5 cups a day and 59 percent lower for men who drank 6 or more cups a day than for men who never drank coffee"
  • Coffee Consumption May Lower Uric Acid Levels - The Precursor of Gout - Medscape, 8/23/07 - "levels of uric acid in the blood significantly decreased with increasing coffee intake, but not with tea intake"
  • Drinking Four Or More Cups Of Coffee A Day May Help Prevent Gout - Science Daily, 5/25/07 - "the data revealed that the risk for developing gout decreased with increasing coffee consumption. The risk of gout was 40 percent lower for men who drank 4 to 5 cups a day and 59 percent lower for men who drank 6 or more cups a day than for men who never drank coffee"

Other News:

  • New drug aids gout patients not helped by standard treatments - Science Daily, 8/16/11 - "Injections of pegloticase, a modified porcine enzyme, can produce significant and sustained clinical improvements in 2 out of 5 patients with chronic gout that is resistant to conventional therapies"
  • Gout Drug May Lower Blood Pressure - WebMD, 9/23/09 - "A new study suggests a direct link between a high-sugar diet and high blood pressure ... allopurinol could lower high blood pressure by lowering uric acid" - Note:  Kind of a confusing article.  Yeah, high blood sugar probably is a cause of high blood pressure and high uric acid but the article implies that allopurinol lowers blood pressure by lowering the uric acid not the blood sugar so why is it discussing blood sugar?  I've  written WebMD before about articles like that and they've agreed and changed it.  This one is minor I guess.
  • New Gout Drug Gets FDA Panel Nod - WebMD, 11/24/08 - "Uloric should be the first new gout drug to be approved in over 40 years ... Unlike allopurinol, very little Uloric is excreted through the urine, making Uloric safe for patients with kidney problems"
  • Blame Sweet Soda for Gout? - WebMD, 1/31/08 - "Compared with men who almost never drank sugar-sweetened soft drinks -- fewer than one per month -- frequent soft-drink drinkers were significantly more likely to suffer gout: ... Two or more soft drinks each day upped gout risk by 85% ... One soft drink each day upped gout risk by 45% ... Five or six soft drinks each week upped gout risk by 29%"
  • Sugar-sweetened soft drinks, diet soft drinks, and serum uric acid level: The third national health and nutrition examination survey - Arthritis Rheum. 2007 Dec 28;59(1):109-116 - "sugar-sweetened soft drink consumption is associated with serum uric acid levels and frequency of hyperuricemia, but diet soft drink consumption is not"
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