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Home > Anti-aging Research > Diets

Diets

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  • High-Protein Diets, Like the Popular Dr. Dukan Diet, Increase the Risk of Developing Kidney Disease in Rats, Study Suggests - Science Daily, 1/21/14 - "researchers studied 20 Wistar rats, divided into two groups of 10. The first group were fed a high-protein diet of commercial hydrolysed protein supplements with a 45% protein level. The control group were fed a normal protein diet. The experiment lasted 12 weeks, which is the equivalent of 9 years in human terms ... the rats on a high-protein diet lost up to 10% of their body weight over the 12 weeks with no improvement in their plasma lipid profile. Moreover, urinary citrate in these rats was 88% lower and urinary pH was 15% more acidic. In the animals fed a high-protein diet, kidney weight increased by 22%, glomerular area -- the network of capillaries that filter blood in the kidneys -- by 13%, and the mesangium -- a collagen structure surrounded by these capillaries -- by 32% ... Eating large amounts of fruit and vegetables reduces the risk of kidney stones forming -- probably due to their high potassium and magnesium content, which compensates for the acidity of the high-protein diet"
  • No Proof That 'Blood-Type' Diets Work: Study - WebMD, 1/20/14 - "researchers looked at 1,455 people and found no proof to support the blood-type diet theory"
  • U.S. News Ranks Best Diets for Weight Loss, Healthy Eating and More - US News and World Report, 1/7/14 - "The panel deemed the DASH diet the best overall, as it outscored most other plans in its healthiness and likelihood to ward off diseases such as diabetes and heart disease. And once again, panelists ranked Weight Watchers the best diet for weight loss, as well as the easiest diet to follow and the top diet among commercial plans"
  • Low fat diet is key to a slimmer figure, study suggests - Science Daily, 12/6/12 - "Exchanging fatty foods for lower fat alternatives will help people shift around three-and-a-half pounds -- without any other form of dieting. People taking part in trials also saw their waist-lines become slimmer, and levels of bad cholesterol decrease ... The results show that eating less fat reduces body weight by 1.6kg, BMI by 0.56kg/m² and waist circumference by 0.5cm. All these effects were in trials in which weight loss was not the intended outcome, suggesting that they occur in people with normal diets. The weight loss happened quickly and was maintained over at least seven years"
  • Diet Plans That Work - US News Best Diets - US News and World Report, 1/4/12 - "Best Diets Overall ... DASH Diet ... TLC Diet ... Best Weight-Loss Diets ... Weight Watchers ... Best Diabetes Diets ... Biggest Loser Diet ... Biggest Loser Diet ... DASH Diet ... Best Heart-Healthy Diets ... Ornish Diet ... TLC Diet"
  • Cut down on 'carbs' to reduce body fat, study authors say - Science Daily, 6/5/11 - "Subjects received either a standard lower-fat diet or a diet with a modest reduction in carbohydrates, or "carbs," but slightly higher in fat than the standard diet. The moderately carb-restricted diet contained foods that had a relatively low glycemic index, a measure of the extent to which the food raises blood glucose levels. This diet consisted of 43 percent calories from carbohydrates and 39 percent calories from fat, whereas the standard diet contained 55 percent of calories from carbohydrates and 27 percent from fat. Protein made up the other 18 percent of each diet ... After the weight maintenance phase, subjects who consumed the moderately carb-restricted diet had 11 percent less deep abdominal fat than those who ate the standard diet. However, when the researchers analyzed results by race, they found it was exclusive to whites. Whites have more deep abdominal fat than Blacks even when matched for body weight or percent body fat, and may benefit from loss of this metabolically harmful depot"
  • Right food effectively protects against risk for diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cognitive decline, study finds - Science Daily, 10/15/10 - "The results of a diet study show that bad cholesterol was reduced by 33 per cent, blood lipids by 14 per cent, blood pressure by 8 per cent and a risk marker for blood clots by 26 per cent. A marker of inflammation in the body was also greatly reduced, while memory and cognitive function were improved ... The test diet was high in antioxidants, low-GI foods (i.e. slow release carbohydrates), omega fatty acids, wholegrain products, probiotics and viscous dietary fibre. Examples of foods eaten were oily fish, barley, soy protein, blueberries, almonds, cinnamon, vinegar and a certain type of wholegrain bread"
  • Mood Improves On Low-fat, But Not Low-carb, Diet Plan - Science Daily, 11/10/09 - "After one year, a low-calorie, low-fat diet appears more beneficial to dieters' mood than a low-carbohydrate plan with the same number of calories"
  • Low-carb Diets Linked To Atherosclerosis And Impaired Blood Vessel Growth - Science Daily, 8/25/09 - "Even as low-carbohydrate/high-protein diets have proven successful at helping individuals rapidly lose weight, little is known about the diets' long-term effects on vascular health ... mice placed on a 12-week low carbohydrate/high-protein diet showed a significant increase in atherosclerosis, a buildup of plaque in the heart's arteries and a leading cause of heart attack and stroke ... our research suggests that, at least in animals, these diets could be having adverse cardiovascular effects that are not reflected in simple serum markers"
  • Low-carb Diets Can Affect Dieters' Cognition Skills - Science Daily, 12/11/08 - "A new study from the psychology department at Tufts University shows that when dieters eliminate carbohydrates from their meals, they performed more poorly on memory-based tasks than when they reduce calories, but maintain carbohydrates. When carbohydrates were reintroduced, cognition skills returned to normal"
  • Ornish: Why Atkins Still Doesn't Beat Low-Fat Diet -  Newsweek, 7/16/08 - "A new study comparing the Atkins diet, a Mediterranean diet and a low-fat diet published on July 17 in The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), is likely to inspire headlines saying that the Atkins diet is better for your waistline and your health than a low-fat diet ... I believe this study is extremely flawed. Here's why: ... funded in part by the Atkins Foundation ... quality of data in this study ..."
  • Low-Carb/High-Fat or High-Carb/Low-Fat Diet Improves Weight Loss, Mood - Medscape, 9/14/07 - "Compared with the HCLF diet, the LCHF diet was associated with significantly greater weight loss (7.8 +/- 0.4 vs 6.4 +/- 0.4 kg; P = .04). Improvements in psychological well-being were similar in both groups, with the greatest effect observed during the first 2 weeks. Although working memory was similar in both groups (P = .68), there was a significant time/diet interaction for speed of processing (P = .04), with less improvement on this measure in the LCHF than in the HCLF diet group"
  • Low-Carbohydrate Diets Appear Effective, But May Raise Cholesterol Levels - Doctor's Guide, 2/14/06
  • 4 Diets Face Off: Which Is the Winner? - WebMD, 1/4/05 - "Who lost the most pounds? Those who followed their diets most closely, no matter which of the four plans they followed"
  • Diet Adherence, Not Diet Type, More Important Factor for Losing Weight - Doctor's Guide, 1/4/05 - "the key to losing weight may not be which diet plan a person picks, but sticking with the plan that is chosen"
  • 4 Popular Diets Heart Healthy - WebMD, 11/10/03 - "the heart disease risk score is based on the ratio between LDL cholesterol and HDL "good" cholesterol ... The Atkins and Zone diets increased HDL by 15%, while Weight Watchers posted an 18.5% gain. But the Ornish diet increased HDL by just 2.2%"
  • Fatty Diet Raises Diabetes Risk - WebMD, 6/20/03 - "surveys of people with diabetes have suggested a link between the amount of saturated fat in a person's diet and diabetes risk, but until now that link has not been confirmed by biological evidence ... they looked at the levels of fatty acids in the blood, which reflects how much saturated fat a person generally eats over time, and compared it to the risk of developing type 2 diabetes among a group of 2,909 adults aged 45-64 ... During nine years of follow-up, 252 of the men and women developed type 2 diabetes ... As the level of fatty acids increased, the likelihood that the person developed type 2 diabetes also increased" - This is something else the Atkin's studies should be looking at.  This study was nine years.  I believe the longest Atkin's study was one year. - Ben
  • High Protein Diets More Effective At Maintaining Weight Loss - Doctor's Guide, 6/4/03 - "Despite no differences in attitudes to eating, a protein intake of 18% as energy versus 15% as energy resulted in improved weight maintenance, as well as improved fat distribution based on body waist circumference, and improved substrate oxidation and satiety"
  • Atkins Diet Lesson: Watch Those Carbs - WebMD, 5/21/03 - "our worries over the Atkins diet go way past the question of whether it is effective for losing weight or even for keeping weight off. We worry that the diet promotes heart disease. ... We have concerns over whether this is a healthy diet for preventing heart disease, stroke, and cancer. There is also potential loss of bone, and the potential for people with liver and kidney problems to have trouble with the high amounts of protein in these diets ... Those on the Atkins diet lost significantly more weight over the first six months of the study. After 12 months, there was little difference in weight between those on the Atkins diet and those who stayed on the low-fat diet" - Sounds like they maxed out with water loss and then it caught up with them.  Plus what happens at 12 months when they start eating a normal diet and they become re-hydrated again. - Ben
  • Intermittent and On-Demand Very Low Calorie Diets Bring Significant Weight Loss - Doctor's Guide, 4/3/03 - "All patients started with 16 weeks on a very low calorie diet. Then, patients assigned to an intermittent group were scheduled to use a very low calorie diet for two weeks every third month, while patients in an on-demand group were told to use a very low calorie diet whenever their body weight passed an individualized cut-off level ... Completers in both groups maintained highly significant weight losses after two years. Patients in the intermittent group lost 7.0 [15.43 pounds] +/- 11.0 [24.25 pounds] kg. Patients in the on-demand group lost 9.1 [20.06 pounds] +/- 9.7 [21.38 pounds] kg"
  • Low-Sugar Diet for Weight Loss - WebMD, 3/4/03 - "Specifically, this is what the UN report says about a healthy diet: Carbohydrates (fruits, vegetables, whole grains, starches) should make up the bulk of total daily calories -- from 55% to 75%. Fat should be 15% -30% total calories (with 10% from saturated fat). Protein should be 10%-15% ... Sugar should be less than 10% of total daily calories ... One hour per day of moderate-intensity activity such as walking, on most days of the week, is needed to maintain a healthy body weight, especially for those people who spend most of their time sitting down"
  • Will The Lost Weight On Atkins Diet Stay Away? - Intelihealth, 11/26/02 - "We will see more gout, more hypertension and more high cholesterol ... Cutting back on carbohydrates helps people lose body water, shed a few pounds and feel less bloated, she said ... Then you cheat - you eat carbohydrates and you gain back the body water. This happens within a day or two"
  • Atkins diet good for cholesterol - USA Today, 11/18/02 - "After six months, the people on the Atkins diet had lost an average of 31 pounds, compared with 20 pounds on the AHA diet, and more people stuck with the Atkins regimen ... Total cholesterol fell slightly in both groups. However, those on the Atkins diet had an 11% increase in HDL, the good cholesterol, and a 49% drop in triglycerides. On the AHA diet, HDL was unchanged, and triglycerides dropped 22%. High triglycerides may raise the risk of heart disease" - That may be true but what about a diet devoid of anti-oxidants making you old before your time.  Plus, how much of that extra 11 pounds was water loss? - Ben
  • Low-Carbohydrate, High-Protein Diets Increase Risk Of Kidney Stones And May Raise Bone Loss Risk - Doctor's Guide, 8/1/02 - "acid excretion - a marker for the acid load in the blood - increased as much as 90 percent while subjects were on diets that severely restricted carbohydrates. Levels of urinary citrate, which inhibits kidney stones, fell by almost 25 percent in the group during the six-week study ... People may lose weight on this diet, but this study shows that this is not a healthy way to lose weight ... there was an increased risk of developing kidney stones and a possible increase in the risk of bone loss"
  • WebMD - Atkins Diet Works; Safety Unknown - WebMD, 7/18/02 - "At the end of six months, 80% of the participants were still on the diet, and they had lost an average of 10% of their original body weight. LDL, or bad cholesterol, decreased in all but one of the dieters, while HDL, or good cholesterol, improved ... there is no mystery to why participants lost weight on the low-carbohydrate diet. Even though calories were not restricted, the dieters ate an average of 1,450 calories per day. Without carbohydrates the body goes into a state called ketosis, which tends to lower appetite ... more study is needed to pronounce the carbohydrate-restricting diet safe"
  • Should We All Be Vegetarians? - Time, 7/15/02 - "a predominantly vegetarian diet may have beneficial effects for kidney and nerve function in diabetics, as well as for weight loss; that eating more fruits and vegetables can slow, and perhaps reverse, age-related declines in brain function and in cognitive and motor performance—at least in rats; that vegetarian seniors have a lower death rate and use less medication than meat-eating seniors; that vegetarians have a healthier total intake of fats and cholesterol but a less healthy intake of fatty acids (such as the heart-protecting omega-3 fatty acids found in fish oil) ... But one paper suggested that low-protein diets (associated with vegetarians) reduce calcium absorption and may have a negative impact on skeletal health. And although several studies on Seventh-Day Adventists (typically vegetarians) indicated that they have a longer-than-average life expectancy, other studies found that prostate-cancer rates were high in Adventists, and one study found that Adventists were more likely to suffer hip fractures ..."
  • Losing Weight with Peanut Butter? - Dr. Weil, 7/10/02 - "a diet high in monounsaturated fats (MUFAs) with 34-36 percent of calories from fat reduced LDL (“bad”) cholesterol by 16-25 percent without lowering HDL (“good”) cholesterol levels. In contrast, the American Heart Associations diet with 25 percent of calories from fat, resulted in only a 12 percent reduction ... people on a diet including 35 percent of calories from MUFAs as well as those on a traditional low-fat, high carbohydrate diet lost an average of 11 pounds over six months. However, by 18 months, three times as many people on the MUFA diet remained with the program and kept off the lost weight while the others regained an average of five pounds each"
  • Vegetarian diet on solid ground, experts say - USA Today, 12/7/01 - "McDougall points to a recent study in the Archives of Internal Medicine that looked at Seventh-Day Adventists in California, a group made up mostly of vegetarians. The 12-year of study of 34,192 people found that on average, group members lived 10 years longer than the general population ... Vegetarians have a 40% less risk of cancer and much less risk of heart disease, diabetes, hypertension, kidney disease and other problems that are common among meat eaters"
  • Study: Lean diet may mean long life - CNN, 9/3/01 - "It's never too late to cut back on the calories to prolong life, even in your later years ... mice they put on a low-calorie regimen -- even creatures put on the diet for a short period -- exhibited characteristics of slowed aging ... Restricting calories reversed the changes in several genes that were altered in aging animals"
  • High-Fat Atkins Diet Shows Small Cholesterol Benefit, But Don't Opt for Bacon Over Broccoli Just Yet - WebMD, 3/23/01 - "there could be a small benefit to a high-fat diet. They randomly assigned 45 adults to eat for 3 months either a high-fat low-carbohydrate diet or a more conventional "heart healthy" diet (American Heart Association Step 2 diet). They found that the while the AHA diet was more effective at reducing overall levels of LDL, only the high-fat diet caused a significant reduction in the amount of very small, dense LDL particles, a form of the bad cholesterol that is thought to be particularly harmful to arteries that nourish the heart, and a major contributor to atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries ... vegetarians had much healthier arteries than the other group ... the real answer may be that a Mediterranean style diet, rich in fruits, vegetables, and grains and relatively low in animals fats, may be the easiest to follow, because it's not as Spartan as the Ornish regimen or as monotonous as the Atkins approach"
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